body horror

All posts tagged body horror

Sleepless Nights with Goodnight Mommy

Published October 2, 2015 by vfdpixie

goodnightmommy

Goodnight Mommy (2014, 99 mins.)

 

Moody twins, cornfields, and an isolated house in the countryside are all ingredients for instant terror in my eyes.  I found it all in Goodnight Mommy, the 2014 Austrian horror that wowed audiences for its disturbing visuals and spiralling story.

Twins Elias and Lukas have to reconnect with their mother after she returns home from extensive surgery.  Her face is obscured by bandages and swollen features, and they are uncertain how to approach her as she seems distant and cold; forgetting sentimental details that make them suspicious.  The boys question her identity, and what should have been an idyllic summer for them turns into a cat and mouse game of shifting realities and sanity as they set out with lethal determination to get their answer.

What this film gives you is precision in its beauty and visual detail.  Each scene is so pleasing to the eye, so well-aligned that you drink in the settings before focusing on the action.  The lush, almost Middle Earth feel to the surrounding forest gives the film an enchanted, fairy tale look, contrasted with the family’s modern and sleek Ikea-on-steroids home that serves as a prison of sorts.  There is a ton of symbolic imagery from tunnels to blurred photographs and crucifixes; and obvious themes of beauty, decay (especially with the children’s odd choice of pets) and renewal, but they never get fully realized as the story takes fun house ride twists of what is real and what is imagined.  I was also disappointed with a reveal that happens far too early in the film.  One thing I enjoy with a horror film is the guess-work, and the mystery aspect was taken away with this one glaring detail.

There was some redemption with the cringe-worthy torture and body horror which worked well as the dynamics switched between mother and sons.  It came hard and fast without lingering too long on excessive gore. Performance-wise, I kept thinking of Michael Haneke’s Funny Games and Pedro Almodovar’s The Skin I Live In as I watched.  Like the characters in these films, mother and sons were all uncomfortably and, for a brief moment elusively, left of center, leaving you wondering what their next move would be. The harshness conveyed by Susanne Wuest as the mother and Elias and Lukas Schwarz as her calculating sons provided lots of tension and suspense.

To sum it up, I liked Goodnight Mommy.  A lot.  I just wanted more exploration, especially with the imagery that became a dead-end, and perhaps a touch more back story (for example, an answer to why the boys seem to be home alone when their mother returns from the hospital).  What you will get from directors Severin Fiala and Veronika Franz is a beautifully filmed and creepy psychological/body horror that is worth a watch even though it lacked some clarity and streamlining.

 

Here is the Goodnight Mommy trailer that the masses were supposedly terrified over.  I would say it is well crafted but misleading…

 

 

Contracted and Disturbed

Published May 5, 2014 by vfdpixie

contracted

Contracted  (2013, 1 hr 18 mins)

During the first 15 minutes of Contracted, I decided not to write a review or finish watching it because I had seen a similar film, Thanatomorphose, at the Blood in the Snow Film Festival last October.  I had read comparisons between the two films and was curious about their similarities.   After sticking it out to the end, however, I changed my mind.  Contracted is the layman’s version of the more avant-garde, artsy Thanatomorphose, becoming almost a better film at times because of a more straightforward plot.

Sam (Najarra Townsend) is a listless, somewhat needy young woman who is a recovered addict.  She is clinging to a failed relationship with Nikki (Kate Stegeman), avoiding advances from the slightly stalkerish Riley (Matt Mercer), who doesn’t quite get that Sam is a lesbian, and bumping heads with her mother (horror veteran Caroline Williams).  One night at her friend’s party, she drinks a tad too much and meets a stranger who drugs her and forces unprotected sex on her.  Oh, and the stranger?  A total creep and necrophiliac.  Sam awakens the next day to a strange period and horrible cramps.  What ensues is a documentation of 3 panic-stricken days where her deteriorating health becomes the consequence of that unwanted, creepy “one-night stand”.

As I watched Contracted, I saw how easy it was to compare it to the Canadian film Thanatomorphose, and as I said before, I was going to skip a review, and the film, all together.  But as the story progressed, I gave it a chance.  I must say that yes, the two films are very similar in terms of the subject matter:  the literal physical and mental decay of a female protagonist in 3 acts, however, Contracted gave the viewer an origin of Sam’s ailment.  The backdrop of a sexually transmitted disease was an interesting take on her transformation into a monster, giving us a visceral account of what happens with unsafe sex and the lack of understanding from Sam’s family and peers.  Thanatomorphose is definitely an art house film, with less direction except for the main character’s obvious decay, leaving a lot of room for speculation as to why she literally dissolves (you can read my review here).

I did have a few issues with Contracted.  I really wanted to know the origins of the necrophiliac, B.J. (played by indie darling and writer/actor of V/H/S and V/H/S 2 Simon Barrett).  The pacing was a little on the slow side (although not as slow as Thanatomorphose), and there were a couple of unbelievable moments like Sam being forced to wait on tables with what looks like a raging case of pink eye and horrible, graying skin.  I don’t know any food server that would be allowed to work in Sam’s condition.  There was also a love scene that was used for obvious shock and gore value, but I challenge anyone to tell me that a touch of makeup and a candlelit room is enough to hide horrific mouth sores and hideously veined skin.  I mean, you are kissing that mouth and NO ONE is that love-sick or horny.  And there was the matter of her being date raped.  That fact seemed to be glossed over as a drunken interlude by her friends, family, ex-girlfriend and doctor which was very disturbing and seemed to make her more of a pariah as her illness progressed.  To be clear (since the director was not), a “one-night stand” and sexual assault are not the same thing.  Finally, Sam’s doctor was a judgemental moron.  I don’t know if the healthcare issue in the U.S. is that bad, but any healthcare worker worth their salt would have admitted her to a hospital immediately after her second visit.  At least in Thanatomorphose, Laura’s reluctance to see a doctor was consistent with her isolation.  As an aside, I also found out that Thanatomorphose was the first of the two films to be released (in October 2012), with director Eric England coming in a close second, apparently writing Contracted in March 2012, filming it in May of the same year, and releasing it in 2013.  Interesting tidbits on these sisters from different misters.

Despite those issues, I did like that Sam was a lesbian, which was a refreshing characterization and really added to the plot, her assault and her contracting this disease, and Townsend did a good job of keeping Sam’s growing panic consistent.  Thanatomorphose had the most unsettling special effects makeup I have seen to date, but Contracted did well for a low-budget film, making me cringe several times as Sam’s body transformed and decayed.  The third day, or act, was also quite good; a culmination of the first two days that snowballed into some really grotesque and horrific scenes, as well as Sam’s final moments in the film.  I also liked the storyline and the paranoia it created around the already real and scary premise of contracting a deadly disease through sex.  There is also talk of a sequel which I normally would look upon with dismay, but I’m actually curious about what director Eric England will bring us.

If you want excruciating, vile and food for thought (gulp!), watch Thanatomorphose.  If you want more mainstream, but still indie, with a slightly (but only slightly) more digestible storyline, watch Contracted.  Both body horrors deal with a woman, her body and loss of control, which to me, is quite horrific.

Thanatomorphose: BITS 2013

Published December 9, 2013 by vfdpixie

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Thanatomorphose (2012, 1hr 40 mins)

The second screening on the first night of BITS Fest was probably, from what I gathered, the most talked about.  Why, you may ask?  Well, because it had to be the most stomach-churning, grotesque, cringe inducing body horror I have seen in a long, long time.  Everyone that I spoke to would ask “Did you see Than..na..mo.., you know which one I’m talking about?”  It left a lot of people grossed out, not impressed or loving it.

 Thanatomorphose  (the French word for “the visible signs of decomposition of an organism caused by death”) is about a woman who is slowly decaying, mentally and physically.  Sounds pretty straightforward, but the progression of events in the film made it a grueling study of her deteriorating life, relationships, and body at an excruciating slow pace so we could see every minute detail.

There were 3 acts:  Despair, Another and Oneself, where we see the main character, Laura (Kayden Rose), attempt to create a relationship with her prick of a boyfriend (David Tousignant), have a half-hearted affair, and create a half-finished sculpture.  Nothing seems to come to fruition as she suffers from some sort of decaying disease and a grand ennui, if you will.  She refuses to get help, and is preoccupied with sex.  Basically naked for most of the film, Laura’s hands are constantly groping herself, seemingly for pleasure, and then for necessity as she tries to keep her bits from falling off.  Duct tape, jars for fingers and ears, and photos are all enlisted to keep some semblance of her former self, until her actions are done in vain as Laura soon becomes a puddle of gore, maggots and a memory.

As the credits started to roll, I was set on dismissing it as a “WTF?” type of film, which on first impulse, it is.  But the more I thought about it, the more intrigued I was because I could relate to Laura’s general discontent and stagnation.  I think it’s a commentary on life and society these days.  Some of us are so desensitized and dead inside that we lose our self-awareness, alienating ourselves and those around us.  Her apartment served as a type of tomb as she isolated herself from “normal life”.  She also maintained her solitude by disposing of anyone who wanted her to get help or found her repulsive.  You only need one person to do some crazy navel gazing, or watch as it rots…

The vagina-shaped crack in the wall above her bed morphed as she did, changing from a mere crevice to a dark sickly looking wound.  Did it symbolize a way out, a rebirth, that was just beyond her reach, the progression of her physical and mental demise, or the perversion of her sexual preoccupation?  And what about the sex and desire aspect of the film?  Laura gave in to her boyfriend’s constant need for her sexually.  She also gave in to her auto-erotic urges with mechanical regularity. It was as if she was trying to feel something, to connect through sex with herself or any willing takers despite her repulsive appearance. When the decay started to change her, she still offered herself up out of habit, even attempting to apply makeup to her rotting face, only to be rejected by all her suitors.  A punishing illustration of how she tried to maintain her former self even though she was already lost.

The sound design for this film was really interesting.  Creaking floorboards, buzzing flies, and Laura’s labored breathing were front and centre, punctuated with a gut wrenching violin score that made the film feel like we were watching through a peephole.

Director Éric Falardeau gave us some insight after the screening.  He said the film was an homage to Cronenberg (The Fly), Polanski (Repulsion) and Buttgereit (Necromantik 2).  This was Kayden Rose’s first lead role, and to help with the character development, the movie was filmed in chronological order, which also helped with the extensive special makeup effects.  David Scherer and Quebec’s own Rémy Couture did the makeup for this film, and they really outdid themselves.  Graphic and grotesque, they took decomposition to another level.  Falardeau also described the use of maggots during the filming and how Rose learned to deal with the ickiness of it all.  The film also walked away with Bloodies Awards for best special effects and best actress.

I’m still not sure of my own feelings about Thanatamorphose.  It was definitely though provoking and unique; an art house film buff’s playground, but the pacing killed me.  If you are going to watch it, prepare yourself for some drawn out scenes, and do not eat while viewing.  Trust me on this.  Not a good choice. What I do know is that I find French horror to be one of the most extreme out there.  From High Tension, to Inside and Martyrs, Thanatomorphose will be added to this list as a stomach-turning study of the fragile human condition

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